Purple Magazine
— The Brain Issue #33

power brains with gloria allred, jess miller and meisha brooks

POWER BRAINS

GLORIA ALLRED
interview
by OLIVIER ZAHM
photography HEJI SHIN 

style by AVENA GALLAGHER

with gloria allred, women’s rights attorney,
jess miller, pursuing a master of divinity
focusing on queer and womanist theology at columbia university, meisha brooks, harvard mechanical
engineer turned model and actress

OLIVIER ZAHM — Can you name some women who’ve inspired you?
GLORIA ALLRED — United States Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg; nominee for president from the Democratic Party, Hillary Rodham Clinton; suffragists Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton; and Harriet Tubman, abolitionist and “conductor” of the Underground Railroad to free slaves.

OLIVIER ZAHM — Women are not afraid anymore to speak out and you’ve never been. Where did you find this personal inner strength?
GLORIA ALLRED — In my high school, the Philadelphia High School for Girls, we were taught that we should have confidence in ourselves. Also, I know that the cost of not speaking out about injustice is often
greater than the cost of speaking out.

OLIVIER ZAHM — People often describe you as fearless: is this true? Or do you also have a vulnerable side?
GLORIA ALLRED — I have both.

OLIVIER ZAHM — You’ve been fighting for women’s rights for 50 years: why do you think it took half a century for changes to start occurring for women?
GLORIA ALLRED — It has not taken 50 years for change to start occurring. Change has been gradually taking place during that time.

OLIVIER ZAHM — What gives you the constant energy to fight and work so tirelessly and persistently?
GLORIA ALLRED — I do believe in what Gandhi said, “Be the change that you wish to see in the world.” I also believe that no one has ever given women and minorities any rights. We have always had to fight to win them. That is what I do every day.

OLIVIER ZAHM — What has changed most in society over the past decade?
GLORIA ALLRED — Women have changed. They are more empowered than they were previously, and they are unwilling to suffer in silence and accept the injustices inflicted upon them.

OLIVIER ZAHM — Are you optimistic or pessimistic about the next decade leading to a better world?
GLORIA ALLRED — Optimistic.

OLIVIER ZAHM — Do you believe that the 21st century will be run by women?
GLORIA ALLRED — No, but I believe we are making progress toward winning equal rights for women. However, we still have a long
way to go.

OLIVIER ZAHM — Do you think the younger generations are as free and political as you were in the ’70s?
GLORIA ALLRED — I think they have more power now and are more significant in politics because of the Internet.

END

GLORIA ALLRED WEARS A CREAM KNIT TOP UNIQLO, PLEATED BLACK SHIRT AND TWILL COAT WITH “B” SILVER EARRINGS BALENCIAGA

Evanie Frausto at STREETERS, hair —  Frankie Boyd at STREETERS using CHANEL BEAUTY, make-up — Kenyon Anderson And Carlos Vigil, photographer’s assistants — Gregory Miller And Mary Reinehr Gigler, stylist’s assistants —  Geraldine Legaspi, hair assistant Jefferson Santiago, make-up assistant —  Isabel Bush at JONI, casting — CONCRETE REP, production — THE MORRISON GROUP, on-set production

[Table of contents]

The Brain Issue #33

Table of contents

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