purple DIARY

: Art
Philippe Parreno GALLERY

PHILIPPE PARRENO "H{N)Y P N(Y}OSIS" OPENING at the Park Avenue Armory, New York

H{N)Y P N(Y}OSIS is an immersive experience that feels like swimming in a multi layered ocean of meaning and sentiments. As he put it himself: “The exhibition is conceived as a scripted space, like an automaton, producing different temporalities, and rhythms. The visitor is guided through the spaces… a mental choreography." Philippe Parreno’s first major exhibition in the United States will give newyorkers a chance to experiment his world of sound and light through a vast marquee installation as well as five videos and a collaboration with Tino Sehgal. H{N)Y P N(Y}OSIS is on view until August 2nd at Park Avenue Armory, 643 Park Avenue, New York.

Text and photo Alexis Dahan

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: Art
Ryan Mc Ginley, “Dash (supermarket)”, 2000 GALLERY

"STORYLINES" GROUP SHOW at the Guggenheim, New York

Bringing together over one hundred works from the Guggenheim’s contemporary collection, Storylines examines the diverse ways in which artists today engage narrative through installation, painting, photography, sculpture, video, and performance. For these artists, storytelling does not necessarily require plots, characters, or settings. Rather, narrative potential lies in everyday objects and materials, and their embedded cultural associations. In projects created through extensive research, acts of appropriation, or performance, the artists in Storylines uncover layers of meaning, turning to individual experience as a means of conveying shared stories, whether real or fictional.

Photos Alexis Dahan and text extracted from press release

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: Productions
READ AN EXTRACT FROM OUR EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH LEGENDARY ARTISTS CLAUDE RUTAULT AND LAWRENCE WEINER BY ALEXIS DAHAN IN PURPLE FASHION #23 OUT NOW +

READ AN EXTRACT FROM OUR EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH LEGENDARY ARTISTS CLAUDE RUTAULT AND LAWRENCE WEINER BY ALEXIS DAHAN IN PURPLE FASHION #23 OUT NOW

alexis dahanI cannot help but notice this apparent similarity in your work: the artwork exists before it is produced.

lawrence weiner — But it’s like that for all artists!

claude rutault — Well, it depends on what “production” means.

alexis dahan — Okay, let’s say material production as opposed to simple formulation or enunciation.

lawrence weiner — Formulating and enunciating is an object!

claude rutault — I agree with Lawrence.

lawrence weiner — This is why it is stupid to say that some forms of art are “conceptual.” All artists are conceptual!

claude rutault — The instant the work is brought to our knowledge, it exists. I personally call that a “de-finition/method.” The difference between us in terms of the use of text is that Lawrence’s text is already the work, whereas for me the text is not the work.

lawrence weiner — I know.

claude rutault — But it is a significant difference. That is why I don’t think it would be possible to confuse our two ways of using text. Lawrence’s third rule…

lawrence weiner — “The piece need not be built.”

claude rutault — Yes. For me the work must be executed. What I produce is a painting. The work may be dictated with the intermediary of a text, but that text is not yet the work. On the contrary, with Lawrence, the text contains all the possibilities.

lawrence weiner — For me it’s the opposite. The object is foreplay; the text is the orgasm. That being said, the two practices function in the same context with the same aspirations.

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: Productions
READ OUR INTERVIEW WITH GABRIEL OROZCO BY OLIVIER ZAHM AND ALEXIS DAHAN IN PURPLE FASHION #23 OUT NOW +

READ OUR INTERVIEW WITH GABRIEL OROZCO BY OLIVIER ZAHM AND ALEXIS DAHAN IN PURPLE FASHION #23 OUT NOW

OLIVIER ZAHMWhy did you escape from the traditionnal work in a studio?

GABRIEL OROZCO — I didn’t want to be in a studio, painting. It was existential, a necessity. It’s not so much that you adapt to the time, but the time gets adapted to you. You start to circulate in the world, and the world starts to circulate in you. Then you’re part of the wave, like surfing; looking at the waves, and you need to reach one. Which one is the right wave for you to catch? That moment for me was in Spain. After that, around ’86 or ’87, I came home to Mexico. And in Mexico, my work was really different from Mexican art. In ’87, I started to work in the streets. I was very alone there. Then photography became very important because many of my friends were photographers. I didn’t have a camera; I borrowed them. Then snap cameras came out, a hundred dollars. It became cheaper.

OLIVIER ZAHMPocket cameras changed your life.

GABRIEL OROZCO — Completely. I could go to dangerous areas in Mexico City and take photos. I could travel.

OLIVIER ZAHMWere you working alone or alongside friends?

GABRIEL OROZCO — A group of artists who were younger than me became interested in what I was doing, and they started coming to my house. We made a workshop, starting in ’87. We made a kind of school. Not so much a collective because they were younger, still developing, not ready; so we studied art, in my house, for five years.

ALEXIS DAHANDid they look up to you?

GABRIEL OROZCO — Yes. They wanted to learn from me. They wanted to know what I knew. They wanted to sneak into my books. They wanted to get some beer. They were very charming.

OLIVIER ZAHMYou created a sort of alternative school?

GABRIEL OROZCO — Yes, by accident I became a teacher very early because they asked me to do it. They came on Fridays. Some days they’d arrive at 10 in the morning and spend the whole day with me, and other times friends came in the afternoon.

Read more in Purple Fashion magazine #23. Click here to buy